The faculty associated with the Philosophy, Politics and Economics Program include:
 

Paul Weithman, Director (on leave 2016-17)

Weithman

Paul Weithman is the Glynn Family Honors Collegiate Professor of Philosophy. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy from Harvard University and his B.A. from the University of Notre Dame. He works in contemporary political philosophy, religious ethics and medieval political theory.


 

Ruth Abbey

abbey

Ruth Abbey is a political theorist with research and teaching interests focusing on Friedrich Nietzsche, Charles Taylor, feminist political thought, liberal political thought and animal ethics.

She is the author of Nietzsche’s Middle Period (Oxford University Press); Philosophy Now: Charles Taylor (Acumen Publishing and Princeton University Press); The Return of Feminist Liberalism (Acumen Publishing and McGill Queens University Press). She is the editor of Contemporary Philosophy in Focus: Charles Taylor (Cambridge University Press) and Feminist Interpretations of Rawls (Penn State University Press). She also has written several journal articles on issues including contemporary liberalism, conceptions of marriage, animal ethics and cyberdemocracy.  Abbey has been the recipient of a Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship and research fellowships at the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study and the Murphy Institute for Ethics and Public Affairs. She currently is book review editor for The Review of Politics and director of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

 

Susan Collins

Susan Collins

Susan Collins is Associate Professor of Political Science, specializing in Ancient Political Philosophy. Her most recent book is a translation of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, with Robert Bartlett (University of Chicago, 2011), including notes, glossary, and interpretive essay. This work was reviewed in the New York Times Book Review and nominated for the John D. Criticos prize. She is also the author of Aristotle and the Rediscovery of Citizenship (Cambridge 2006), co-author and translator of Empire and the Ends of Politics: Plato’s “Menexenus” and Pericles’ Funeral Oration (Focus 1999), and co-editor of Action and Contemplation: Studies in the Moral and Political Thought of Aristotle (SUNY 1999), in addition to peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reviews. She is currently working on Herodotus and Thucydides and a study of Ancient Sparta, political founding, and the regime in Classical thought. Her teaching ranges the history of political thought, with a focus on the Ancient era.

 

Richard Garnett

Rick Garnett

Professor Richard Garnett teaches and writes about the freedoms of speech, association, and religion, and also about constitutional law more generally. He is a leading authority on questions and debates regarding the role of religious believers and beliefs in politics and society. He has published widely on these matters, and is the author of dozens of law-review articles and book chapters. His current research project, Two There Are: Understanding the Separation of Church and State, will be published by Cambridge University Press. Professor Garnett clerked for the late Chief Justice of the United States William H. Rehnquist during the Court’s 1996 term and also for the late Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, Richard S. Arnold.




 

Alexander Jech

jech

Alexander Jech is a faculty member in the Department of Philosophy. He received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Notre Dame. His research interests include ethics, social and political philosophy, Russian literature and the French Revolution.




 

 

Terence Johnson

terrence_johnson

Terence Johnson is the Joe and Deborah Loughery Assistant Professor in Economics and Human Development College Chair and a Kellogg faculty fellow at the University of Notre Dame. Johnson investigates the informational and institutional inefficiencies that hamper markets in developing countries, and uses tools from mechanism design and industrial organization economics to design and test solutions. With Molly Lipscomb, he is currently investigating how markets for sanitation services in Burkina Faso and Ghana can be improved through call-in center platforms that more efficiently match households to providers, targeted subsidies to households, or centralization of the market. An ongoing Kellogg-supported research project, with Wyatt Brooks and Kevin Donovan, “Entrepreneurship in Kenya: Can Experience Be Taught?” considers the impact of mentorship on entrepreneurial activity in Dandora, Kenya. His scholarly work appears in the Journal of Economic Theory and the Oxford Handbook of Market Design. He holds a PhD from the University of Maryland, College Park.


 

Daniel Kelly

kelly.jpg

Dan Kelly is Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame. Prior to joining the faculty, Professor Kelly was a Terence M. Considine Research Fellow in Law and Economics and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School. Previously, he clerked for the Honorable Richard C. Wesley of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, worked as a litigation associate at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP, and was a John M. Olin Research Fellow at Yale Law School.

Professor Kelly’s research and teaching interests include property, land use, and natural resources law, as well as trusts and estates. His current projects explore the effectiveness of eminent domain, secret buying agents, and other mechanisms for overcoming holdouts and assembling land and the idea of “strategic spillovers,” the opportunistic use of property to harm others in order to extract payments in exchange for desisting. Professor Kelly received his J.D., cum laude, in 2005 from Harvard Law School and his B.A., summa cum laude, in 2002 from the University of Notre Dame.

 

Mary Keys (Acting Director, 2016-17)

Mary Keys

(B.A., Boston College; Ph.D., University of Toronto, 1998) Associate Professor, Keys’ research and teaching interests span a broad spectrum of political theory, with a special focus in Christianity, ethics, and political thought. She is the author of Aquinas, Aristotle, and the Promise of the Common Good (Cambridge University Press, 2006), and of articles appearing in the American Journal of Political Science and History of Political Thought. She has held numerous grants and fellowships, most recently a NEH Fellowship supporting her research project on “Humility and Modern Politics” during the 2006-2007 academic year. She was a Visiting Scholar at Harvard University’s Department of Government from 2007-2008.

Advising specialties: Rhodes; Truman; volunteer work.

Research and teaching interests: History of political philosophy; ethics and political philosophy; religion and political philosophy; Christian political thought; Catholic social teaching.


 

Atalia Omer

atalia_omer

Atalia Omer earned her Ph.D. (November 2008) from the Committee on the Study of Religion at Harvard University. Her research interests include the theoretical study of the interrelation between religion and nationalism; religion, nationalism, and peacebuilding; the role of national/religious/ethnic diasporas in the dynamics of conflict transformation and peace; multiculturalism as a framework for conflict transformation and as a theory of justice; the role of subaltern narratives in reimagining questions of peace and justice; intra-group dialogue and the contestation of citizenship in ethno-religious national contexts; and the symbolic appropriation of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in other zones of conflict.

Her first book When Peace is Not Enough: How the Israeli Peace Camp Thinks about Religion, Nationalism, and Justice (University of Chicago Press) examines the way the Israeli peace camp addresses interrelationships between religion, ethnicity, and nationality and how it interprets justice vis-à-vis the Palestinian conflict. Omer has published articles in the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, The Journal of Political Theology, The Study of Nationalism and Ethnicity, and The International Journal of Peace Studies.


 

Jason Springs

jason_springs

Jason A. Springs earned his Ph.D. in Religion and Society from Harvard University’s Committee on the Study of Religion (2005). His research and teaching broadly integrate religious ethics with moral philosophy, political and social theories with specific attention to modern European and North American contexts.

Springs is particularly interested in conceptions of religious toleration and the challenges posed by religious pluralism for transforming conflict; ethical, philosophical and theological dimensions of restorative justice with particular attention to mass incarceration in the U.S.; democratic theories and practices as frameworks for peacebuilding. These concerns are oriented by his broader research interests in American Pragmatist thought and postliberal theology.  Springs is the author of Toward a Generous Orthodoxy: Prospects for Hans Frei’s Postliberal Theology (Oxford University Press, 2010), and co-author (with Atalia Omer) of Religious Nationalism: A Reference Handbook (ABC-CLIO, 2013).


 

James Sullivan

Jim Sullivan

Jim Sullivan is the Rev. Thomas J. McDonagh, C.S.C. Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame, a research affiliate of the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan and the co-founder of the Wilson-Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunity. His research examines the consumption, saving, and borrowing behavior of poor households in the U.S., and how welfare and tax policy affects the well-being of the poor. His most recent work examines changes in consumption and income poverty in the U.S. over the past three decades.  His research has been supported by grants from the Smith Richardson Foundation, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was a recipient of the W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research Dissertation Award in 2003. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Notre Dame and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University.


 

Abigail Wozniak

Abigail Wozniak

Abigail Wozniak is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Notre Dame, working primarily in the field of labor economics. Her research has examined migration between states and cities as well as employer compensation and screening policies. Professor Wozniak is currently a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn, Germany. Over 2014-2015, she served as Senior Economist to the White House Council of Economic Advisers, working on labor economics issues. She was a Visiting Fellow at Princeton University in 2008-09. She is a graduate of Harvard University (PhD) and the University of Chicago (AB). She is a Wisconsin native and a former Associate Economist at the Chicago Federal Reserve. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Huffington Post, Businessweek, and other outlets.